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Data Model Classes

Most of API Logic Server functionality derives from the data model classes created from your schema when you create your project with ApiLogicServer create.

It operates as described below.

Create models.py from schema

ApiLogicServer create builds the database/models.py file, with a class for each table:

class Category(SAFRSBase, Base):             #  <--- singular/capitalized tablename
    __tablename__ = 'CategoryTableNameTest'  #  <--- from schema
    _s_collection_name = 'Category'          #  <--- defaults from class name - endpoint, admin reference
    Id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    CategoryName = Column(String(8000))
    Description = Column(String(8000))



class Order(SAFRSBase, Base):
    __tablename__ = 'Order'
    _s_collection_name = 'Order'
    __table_args__ = (
        ForeignKeyConstraint(['Country', 'City'], ['Location.country', 'Location.city']),
    )

    Id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    CustomerId = Column(ForeignKey('Customer.Id'), nullable=False, index=True)
    EmployeeId = Column(ForeignKey('Employee.Id'), nullable=False, index=True)
    # etc
    AmountTotal = Column(DECIMAL(10, 2))
    Country = Column(String(50))
    City = Column(String(50))
    Ready = Column(Boolean, server_default=text("TRUE"))
    OrderDetailCount = Column(Integer, server_default=text("0"))
    CloneFromOrder = Column(ForeignKey('Order.Id'))

    # see backref on parent: parent = relationship('Order', remote_side=[Id], cascade_backrefs=True, backref='OrderList')
    # see backref on parent: Location = relationship('Location', cascade_backrefs=True, backref='OrderList')
    # see backref on parent: Customer = relationship('Customer', cascade_backrefs=True, backref='OrderList')
    # see backref on parent: Employee = relationship('Employee', cascade_backrefs=True, backref='OrderList')

    parent = relationship('Order', remote_side=[Id], cascade_backrefs=True, backref='OrderList')  # special handling for self-relationships
    OrderDetailList = relationship('OrderDetail', cascade='all, delete', cascade_backrefs=True, backref='Order')  # manual fix

This was derived from sqlacodgen -- many thanks! (It is not necessary to pip this into your project - it's part of API Logic Server).

 

Class (end point) for each table

A class is created for each table. The name (e.g. Order) is derived from the table name: capitalized and singlularized.

 

End point name from Class

These class names are used as the default API endpoint name. Override them as described below.

 

Overriding the Class Name

Developers often want to control endpoint names. To do so, edit the value of _s_collection_name as shown above.

 

Relationship Names

Your class model includes accessors for related data:

  1. Relationships are created on the one side of one-to-many relationships. The relationship name is the target class + "List", and is available in Python (items = anOrder.OrderDetailList). These names are used in your UI admin apps, and your API

  2. Relationships have 2 names; the backref name is how the many side refers to the one side (e.g., anOrder = anOrderDetail.order)

Relationship names are also part of your API:

relns-api

Each database has extensions which can introduce issues in model generation, so facilities are described in Troubleshooting to edit models and rebuild.

Relationship names are derived from database foreign keys, as described here. As described in the link, you can add missing foreign keys in your data model classes.

Model Linkages

The diagram below illustrates how the class aspects and the admin app tie together:

relns-admin

Override s_count: performance

If you see performance issues in loading the API, explore overriding s_count:

performance - override s_count

View Support

Views are supported with the following restrictions:

  • They are created in models.py as tables, not classes
  • They are not part of API automation
    • You can expose views with custom APIs, as shown here -- search for *view

 


Appendix: Pre 9.1.0 (SQLAlchemy 2 typing)

Release 9.1.0 enhanced data model attribute / relationship typing, based on SQLAlchemy 2. Prior to that release, classes were created like this:

class Category(SAFRSBase, Base):                #  <--- singular/capitalized tablename
    __tablename__ = 'CategoryTableNameTest'     #  <--- from schema
    _s_collection_name = 'Category'             #  <--- defaults from class name - endpoint, admin 
    __bind_key__ = 'None'

    Id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    CategoryName = Column('CategoryName_ColumnName', String(8000))  # manual fix - alias
    Description = Column(String(8000))
    Client_id = Column(Integer)

    @jsonapi_attr
    def _check_sum_(self):                      # <--- optimistic locking
        return None if isinstance(self, flask_sqlalchemy.model.DefaultMeta) \
            else self._check_sum_property if hasattr(self,"_check_sum_property") \
                else None  # property does not exist during initialization

    @_check_sum_.setter
    def _check_sum_(self, value):  # type: ignore [no-redef]
        self._check_sum_property = value

    S_CheckSum = _check_sum_



class Order(SAFRSBase, Base):
    __tablename__ = 'Order'
    _s_collection_name = 'Order'  # type: ignore
    __bind_key__ = 'None'
    __table_args__ = (
        ForeignKeyConstraint(['Country', 'City'], ['Location.country', 'Location.city']),
    )

    Id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    CustomerId = Column(ForeignKey('Customer.Id'), nullable=False, index=True)
    EmployeeId = Column(ForeignKey('Employee.Id'), nullable=False, index=True)
    OrderDate = Column(String(8000))
    RequiredDate = Column(Date)
    # etd
    AmountTotal : DECIMAL = Column(DECIMAL(10, 2))  # <--- Observe typing
    Country = Column(String(50))
    City = Column(String(50))
    Ready = Column(Boolean, server_default=text("TRUE"))
    OrderDetailCount = Column(Integer, server_default=text("0"))
    CloneFromOrder = Column(ForeignKey('Order.Id'))

    # parent relationships (access parent)
    Order : Mapped["Order"] = relationship(remote_side=[Id], back_populates=("OrderList"))
    Location : Mapped["Location"] = relationship(back_populates=("OrderList"))
    Customer : Mapped["Customer"] = relationship(back_populates=("OrderList"))
    Employee : Mapped["Employee"] = relationship(back_populates=("OrderList"))

    # child relationships (access children)
    OrderList : Mapped[List["Order"]] = relationship(back_populates="Order")
    OrderDetailList : Mapped[List["OrderDetail"]] = relationship(cascade="all, delete", back_populates="Order")  # manual fix

 

Appendix: Pre 6.5.0 (End Point names from table names)

This functionality was altered in version 6.4.6. In prior versions, it operated as shown in the example below:

  • On the right are the created data model classes
  • On the left are references to it from the Admin Web App admin.yaml model file that defines how the app behaves:

relns-admin-z

Observe that:

  1. A class is created for each table. The name (e.g. OrderDetail) is derived from the table name, but is capitalized and singlularized

  2. The table name is from your schema, this corresponds to a resource collection in the API

  3. Relationships are created on the one side of one-to-many relationships. The relationship name is the target class + "List", and is available in Python (items = anOrder.OrderDetailList). These names are used in your UI admin apps, and your API

  4. Relationships have 2 names; the backref name is now the many side refers to the _one" side (e.g., anOrder = anOrderDetail.order`)

Relationship names are also part of your API:

relns-api-z

Each database has extensions which can introduce issues in model generation, so facilities are described in Troubleshooting to edit models and rebuild.